23/May/2018
Wednesday, 23 May 2018

The most inaccessible monasteries in the world

The most inaccessible monasteries in the world

Xuankong Si Temple (The Hanging Monastery)

SHANXI, CHINA

This is the only monastery to combine the three traditional religions of China: Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoismo. It was built 1,500 years ago between the rocks to shelter it from the rain and snow.

Sigiriya

MATALE, SRI LANKA

Built to be a fortified palace, it was later converted into a Buddhist monastery. It stands on the imposing ‘Lion’s Rock’ and the entrance is flanked by huge claws.

Resultado de imaxes para Sigiriya MATALE, SRI LANKA

Katskhi Pillar

KATSKHI, GEORGIA

This small church is perched atop a rocky 30-metre pillar. A solitary monk lives inside but he only accepts male visitors who are brave enough to climb the precarious stairs.

Resultado de imaxes para Katskhi Pillar  KATSKHI, GEORGIA

The Meteora Monasteries

METEORA, GRECIA

The hermits used to believe that the higher they went to pray, the closer they would be to God. During the 11th and 12th centuries, they abandoned their solitary caves to create as many as 24 monasteries, of which only six remain today.

Resultado de imaxes para The Meteora Monasteries  METEORA, GRECIA

Paro Taktsang Dzong (Tiger’s Nest Monastery)

PARO, BHUTAN

Built near the cave where it is said Guru Padmasambhava meditated for three years, three months, three weeks, three days and three hours before establishing Buddhism in Bhutan back in the 8th century.

Resultado de imaxes para Paro Taktsang Dzong (Tiger’s Nest Monastery)

Taung Kalat Monastery

BAGAN, MYANMAR

After climbing the 777 steps that lead to the pagoda, it’s time to pray that Mount Popa, the volcano upon which the monastery sits, doesn’t decide to wake up from its long slumber.

Mt. Popa, Mandalay Division, Myanmar.

Source: Passenger6a.

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